Raising awareness for Hispanic and LatinX bone marrow donors

John Concado is a DKMS bone marrow donor. To help raise awareness in the Hispanic and LatinX communities, he wanted to share his story about being a donor.

“My life changed 12 years ago. I didn’t know it at the time, but it did. I was in New York City training with a group for the San Diego marathon. One of my coaches’ friends had been diagnosed with cancer and needed a bone marrow transplant. I didn’t really know too much about what that meant, but a group of us swabbed our cheeks and that was that. It took five minutes. I swabbed my cheeks and didn’t give it another thought.”

But then five years later the phone rang. I’m an actor, and as I’m waiting for callbacks, I am always answering numbers I don’t recognize. And this call was definitely for a more important role.

I remember the day...It was kind of a crappy day - either raining or snowing - I was going to my agent’s office and I got a phone call. I ducked into a Chase bank vestibule to take the call. The person said, ‘this is DKMS. Do you remember signing up for the bone marrow registry?’ I thought it was for the person who we had all signed up. But it wasn’t. It was for a person who had been sick for 20 years and this was going to change his life.

I was told that I was a perfect match. It was really amazing. So I asked some questions. I even called my doctor to learn more. I wanted to make sure I knew what I was doing.

“BUT I CALLED BACK THE NEXT DAY AND SAID, ‘YEAH, I’LL DO IT.”

For a moment, I did think, "well what if this person is a bad person?" But ultimately, I thought I would want someone to just blindly give, so I put that out of my mind and moved on with the process.

There were some funny things that happened during this whole thing. I had told the DKMS coordinator that I was a blood donor, and about how much I enjoyed the cookies they give you when you’re done donating. I told her that I since bone marrow was a little bit of a bigger deal, that I wanted an entire package of Oreos after I was done. Of course, I was kidding, but she brought them! To this day, every year I get a thank you gift from my patient’s family...a package of Oreos from wherever they happen to be in the world at that time.”

Leading up to the procedure, one of the nurses or techs mentioned that I didn’t have veins that were "popping." I took that to heart, and for the next month, while I was waiting to donate, I just used those hand grip strengtheners and stress balls and I would do thousands of squeezes per day. And sure enough, my veins were great the day of the donation.

“ON THE DAY I DONATED, I WAS THERE FOR 5 OR 6 HOURS. AND IRONICALLY, IT WAS THE SAME HOSPITAL THAT I WAS BORN AT.

The next day I went to the opera with my mom. I felt fine. The only discomfort I ever felt was some muscle soreness from the shots that I took leading up to the donation. It really was very easy on me.

I always thought of the patient I donated to as my “GSP” - my genetically similar person. People always laugh when I tell them that because it sounds like a boy band. But it’s important to realize the significance of that.

Because we live in an ever diversified, global world, we have so many amazing beautiful families that are increasingly diverse and culturally rich. And for those families, should they have a family member that needs a bone marrow transplant it will be much harder to find a match. That’s why people need to register. They need their GSPs to join the registry.

"In the latin american community, there is a lack of information and trust about bone marrow and stem cell donation."

We can fix this. We need to.

Being a registered bone marrow donor is like an insurance policy for your community. You never know when you might help someone.

Gave my donor’s family second chances and that’s really humbling. I’ve gotten a lot of love for doing this and it wasn’t hard. I truly feel that I’ve gotten a lot out of it. I’m truly grateful.

IT IS EASY TO HELP. YOU CAN STEP UP NOW.

Registering Online is easy, secure, and only takes 5 minutes. Though the chances to be called as a donor are rare - 1 in 430 - if called, you are likely the patient's best match. Your decision can give hope and a second chance at life.

After registering, you have to swab your cheeks and send the kit back to DKMS. It is all free of costs.

¡Salvar vidas comienza aquí!

Inscribirse para tener a oportunidad de salvar una vida es emocionante, pero antes de comenzar, asegúrate de no haberte inscrito antes en algún otro centro de donación. Además, pedimos que todos los donantes que se inscriban estén dispuestos a donar a cualquier paciente. Finalmente, desplázate hacia abajo para conocer las dos maneras de donar.

¡Salvar vidas comienza aquí!

AVERIGUA SI ERES ELEGIBLE

Como donante inscrito de médula ósea, podrías ser llamado a salvar una vida en cualquier momento.

Actualmente resido en los Estados Unidos.

United States

Soy un miembro del ejército.

Ingrese su fecha de nacimiento.

Estoy en buena salud general.

¿No es seguro?

Hagamos una verificación rápida

Introduzca sus datos

¡Usted es elegible!

Siguiente paso... Completa el proceso de registro.

Gracias por preocuparte.

Si vives fuera de los Estados Unidos, comunícate con un centro de donantesen el país en donde vives.  

 

Podrías reunir los requisitos para inscribirte en una de nuestras oficinas internacionales:

or

o también puedes...

Haz una donación

Gracias por preocuparte.

 

Thank you for caring.

Debe tener entre 18 y 55 años de edad.

 

¡Pero todavía hay muchas otras maneras de ayudar!

Ayúdanos a recaudar fondos

o

Gracias por preocuparte.

Tienes que estar sano para ser elegible.

 

¡Pero todavía hay muchas otras maneras de ayudar!

Ayúdanos a recaudar fondos

o

Gracias por preocuparte.

Su IMC debe ser menor de 40.

 

¡Pero todavía hay muchas otras maneras de ayudar!

Ayúdanos a recaudar fondos

o

 

Hagamos una verificación rápida

Queremos asegurarnos de que ayudar a un paciente no afectará su salud. Revise la siguiente lista de criterios. Si no está seguro acerca de un requisito, no dude en llamarnos al 866.340.3

USTED ES ELIGIBLE PARA REGISTRAR SI USTED ES:

  • Entre las edades de 18 y 55
  • En buen estado general
  • Al menos 4'10" y pesa más de 105 libras, pero no excede un IMC máximo de 40.

USTED NO ES ELEGIBLE PARA REGISTRARSE SI TIENE:

  • HIV
  • Antecedentes de cirugía cardíaca o enfermedad cardíaca
  • Trastornos autoinmunes tales como lupus, artritis reumatoide, esclerosis múltiple o fibromialgia
  • Apnea del sueño, problemas respiratorios o asma severa (los inhaladores diarios son aceptables)
  • Diabetes que requiere insulina o medicamento inyectable
  • Hepatitis B o C
  • Enfermedad renal o hepática
  • Historia del accidente cerebrovascular, incluyendo TIA
  • Problemas crónicos o severos en el cuello, columna vertebral o espalda
  • Epilepsia u otras convulsiones dentro de un año
  • Historia de la coagulación sanguínea o trastornos hemorrágicos
  • Antecedentes de lesiones en la cabeza o conmociones múltiples
  • Antecedentes personales de cáncer (excepciones: fase 0 o melanoma in situ, cáncer de piel localizada en la mama, la vejiga, el cuello uterino y el curado, como el carcinoma basocelular o de células escamosas)

Si tiene preguntas sobre si su historial médico le impediría donar, por favor contacte donorrelations@dkms.org o 212.209.6700.

¡PODRÍAS SALVAR LA VIDA DE ALGUIEN!

She Became a Bone Marrow Donor and Saved a Life!
¡Tú puedes salvar la vida de alguien!


Aproximadamente el 70% de todos los pacientes que necesitan trasplantes de médula ósea se ven obligados a buscar un donante compatible fuera de sus familias. Mira este video para conocer cómo Madison dedicó su tiempo a salvar la vida de una desconocida. 

JUST A FEW STEPS TO BE A POTENTIAL DONOR

Register Online

1.

Register online

2.

Get the kit and swab your cheeks

3.

Mail back your kit

4

Registry Confirmation

Click here to learn how to swab.

People Who Need Your Help

Marley

Marley

In July 2018, Marley was diagnosed with aplastic anaemia and doctors say his best chance of survival is to have a bone marrow transplant. A search of the registry has returned no matches for Marley. Now, his family is campaigning to find #MarrowforMarley in the hope of finding him a matching blood stem cell donor.

Heston

Heston

Heston was diagnosed in January 2016 with Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome, a disease that can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. The need for a bone marrow transplant for Heston is becoming more urgent, and there are no current matches for him. While his condition is getting more serious, his outlook and strength are very strong.

HOW BONE MARROW DONATIONS WORK

Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Donation

This is the donation method used in 75% of cases. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell (PBSC) donation is a non-surgical, outpatient procedure that collects blood stem cells via the bloodstream. These same blood-forming cells found in bone marrow are also found in the circulating (peripheral) blood. It takes about 4-8 hours on 1-2 consecutive days.

Bone Marrow Donation

This is the donation method used in about 25% of cases, generally when the patient is a child. It is a 1-2 hour surgical procedure performed under anesthesia, so no pain is experienced during the donation. Marrow cells are collected from the back of your pelvic bone using a syringe.

DKMS FACTS

DKMS is the world’s largest bone marrow donor center with more than 9 million registered donors, more than 80,000 of whom have helped save lives by donating marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. Within the U.S., DKMS has registered more than 1 million donors and facilitated over 3,900 donations.

Other Ways to Help

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